Question – Repeat after me:

purplechansey:

cynicallyjaded:

dionthesocialist:

  • Mental disorders are medical conditions.
  • Mental disorders are not personality quirks.

Repeat after me…

  • Labels will give you mental disorders
  • Labels will reinforce your submission to a condition 
  • Labels will destroy you
  • Labels will imprison you
  • Labels are just that…labels

Now, let’s try again…

  • Stop labelling your state of mind, it’s the same as stereotyping someone and expecting them to act differently
  • The more we ‘recognise’ so-called mental disorders as valid medical conditions, the weaker society becomes in dealing holistically with social ills because every bad experience can suddenly be ‘fixed’ with a pill
  • Neuroplasticity is proof that mental ‘disorders’ are merely a state of mind that can be altered based on experience and introspection
  • Experience has confirmed that insecurity and fears of insignificance are the most common underlying causes of symptoms of a troubled mind (a.k.a. mental disorders) and not some chemical imbalance
  • Chemical reactions are triggered by thoughts and stimuli, not the other way around. Simple proof of this is a smile. It’s confirmed to release feel-good hormones regardless of your ‘mental disorder’

Separate the symptoms from the root cause and never confuse the two. Far too often, especially in western medicine, symptoms are almost always the focus of treatment with a holistic view shunned as being a quack’s approach to good health. The mind and body work in tandem, and not independently. Abuse one, and you’ll automatically abuse the other. Treating a physical ailment without considering the psychological or emotional triggers that caused one to be predisposed to the ailment is like taking energy drinks when you know you’re not getting enough sleep. It really is that simple.

Give yourself a chance. You deserve to believe in yourself, because people are strange like that. They rarely believe in you unless you believe in yourself first. Think about it, and give yourself a break.

I definitely understand where you’re coming from, but there are a couple of points in which I take issue with.

“Neuroplasticity is proof that mental ‘disorders’ are merely a state of mind that can be altered based on experience and introspection.”

Not necessarily. Yes, neuroplasticity has shown that the brain changes through various stages of life (and through various personal experiences), but that does not necessarily imply that mental disorders are all of a sudden reduced to nothing but “bad thoughts that can altered.” There is no denying that some mental disorders (I will get to why I italicized mental disorders and some in a bit) are indeed a chemical imbalance in the brain. Hence, why some truly need medication, and why it works for them. Where I do agree with you (or at least agree with what I suppose you’re getting at) is that medications are far overused, over-perscribed, and that a lot of what we have going on as “mental disorders” aren’t really mental disorders.

Yes, many of them should be treated by psychotherapy instead of just popping a pill. Unfortunately, that takes much longer in the doctor’s office, so they just write them off a prescription (or four) and call it a day. Also, I agree with what you have to say when it comes to labels. Some of what is labeled under mental disorders by the DSM IV I wouldn’t necessarily want to call a mental disorder. Labels do suck, and indeed, they hold you back. Thing is, chemical imbalances do exist. They are very much a possible cause in the cases of some mental disorders. Schizophrenia being a fine example of that. And while yes, some chemical reactions are triggered by certain thoughts, experiences, and stimuli, do not forget the many that are genetically predisposed or more prone to developing such disorders. 

Thanks for sharing those views. I agree with you on most of what you say with just one qualifier. I mentioned in previous posts, under the link that I included previously, that medication is definitely warranted as an intervention strategy. I just get really concerned when I hear people saying that they’re predisposed to depression and have been told that they will have to take anti-depressants for the rest of their lives. 

That’s the level of abuse that we’ve come to because of the labelling of life’s struggles by suggesting that they’re in fact illnesses. They’re not. Like everything in life, there are exceptions, but the current trend is that anything that goes against the utopian ideal of a balanced life is somehow not the individual’s faults because they probably have a chemical imbalance causing them to behave irrationally, aggressively, or otherwise. 

Repeat after me:

dionthesocialist:

  • Mental disorders are medical conditions.
  • Mental disorders are not personality quirks.

Repeat after me…

  • Labels will give you mental disorders
  • Labels will reinforce your submission to a condition 
  • Labels will destroy you
  • Labels will imprison you
  • Labels are just that…labels

Now, let’s try again…

  • Stop labelling your state of mind, it’s the same as stereotyping someone and expecting them to act differently
  • The more we ‘recognise’ so-called mental disorders as valid medical conditions, the weaker society becomes in dealing holistically with social ills because every bad experience can suddenly be ‘fixed’ with a pill
  • Neuroplasticity is proof that mental ‘disorders’ are merely a state of mind that can be altered based on experience and introspection
  • Experience has confirmed that insecurity and fears of insignificance are the most common underlying causes of symptoms of a troubled mind (a.k.a. mental disorders) and not some chemical imbalance
  • Chemical reactions are triggered by thoughts and stimuli, not the other way around. Simple proof of this is a smile. It’s confirmed to release feel-good hormones regardless of your ‘mental disorder’

Separate the symptoms from the root cause and never confuse the two. Far too often, especially in western medicine, symptoms are almost always the focus of treatment with a holistic view shunned as being a quack’s approach to good health. The mind and body work in tandem, and not independently. Abuse one, and you’ll automatically abuse the other. Treating a physical ailment without considering the psychological or emotional triggers that caused one to be predisposed to the ailment is like taking energy drinks when you know you’re not getting enough sleep. It really is that simple.

Give yourself a chance. You deserve to believe in yourself, because people are strange like that. They rarely believe in you unless you believe in yourself first. Think about it, and give yourself a break.

The Truth About Introverts

I get the good intention behind this poster that has been going around for a while now, but I respectfully disagree with it. It is based on the premise that being an introvert is actually a handicap of sorts and requires special attention. It also labels people, which is something that I vehemently disagree with in the strongest of terms. 

I have seen, and continue to see many people that actually succumb to the expected behavioural patterns of the labels that they’re assigned by society to the point where they start acting the way they’re conditioned to do so rather than because it’s something they would actively or consciously do. The moment we label people’s state of mind, we set in motion many negative sequences and patterns of behaviour. 

The point I’m trying to make is that unless there is a physical defect that causes someone to behave strangely, any awkwardness or unusual behaviour is simply a symptom of their self-esteem or present state of mind. If this label of introvert were true, you would never see an ‘introvert’ light up the moment they find they’re in their element amongst people they can trust where their contribution is appreciated and they have no need to feel incompetent or insignificant. If they were truly afflicted with a state of ‘introvertism’ then that kind of behaviour would never be possible.

It’s not about introverts versus extroverts. It’s about confidence or a lack thereof. It’s a simple matter of someone feeling significant and appreciated, or not. And don’t confuse it with someone that is naturally introspective versus someone that has no time for the detail that begs to be observed. It’s simply about focus, personal preferences, and the like. 

Some colleagues of mine once played a trick on one of their co-workers. Despite the guy being perfectly healthy, they all conspired to make comments about how he wasn’t looking very well at all, and that he really should take time to rest. They repeated this cycle for a few hours in the morning with various people making comments about the way he looked, his demeanour, his eyes looking tired, etc. By lunchtime, he felt physically ill and asked for time off work. And he looked ill as well. 

Another experiment carried out on kids in the first or second grade showed how negative associations play out in actual academic performance. Half the kids in the class were given blue ribbons to tie around their heads with the other half given red ribbons. The one group was told that they got the blue ribbons because they weren’t so smart, and the other group was told that they were smarter than the blue team. That resulted in the normally smart kids with blue ribbons suddenly doubting themselves and slipping back when asked questions in class, while kids that were normally slackers wearing red ribbons were suddenly enthusiastic and engaged. 

We often respond to the labels and stereotypes that society places on us without realising it. It starts out innocently because it just makes it easier to put people into boxes the moment they act against the norm, but this convenience for the ‘normal’ people has massively detrimental effects on those being boxed in this way. This instant gratification culture that we have going suggests that anything out of the norm should be fixed with a pill. It’s made us lazy to apply our minds and to engage meaningfully. Anything outside the norm is inconvenient and shunned unless it has a sensational or fashionable quality about it. 

Sorry for the word spam, but there’s so much more that can be said about this. The bottom line is:

Please don’t label people’s state of mind just because they appear to be different. It’s the ones that sit back and observe that see things with a fresh perspective, rather than the ones that fit in and do nothing but perpetuate the norms, that actually add to the wholesomeness and progress of society. The rest just maintain the status quo.

Top 10 Myths About ‘Introverts’

Top 10 Myths about Introverts

Myth #1 – Introverts don’t like to talk. This is not true. Introverts just don’t talk unless they have something to say. They hate small talk. Get an introvert talking about something they are interested in, and they won’t shut up for days.

Myth #2 – Introverts are shy. Shyness has nothing to do with being an Introvert. Introverts are not necessarily afraid of people. What they need is a reason to interact. They don’t interact for the sake of interacting. If you want to talk to an Introvert, just start talking. Don’t worry about being polite.

Myth #3 – Introverts are rude. Introverts often don’t see a reason for beating around the bush with social pleasantries. They want everyone to just be real and honest. Unfortunately, this is not acceptable in most settings, so Introverts can feel a lot of pressure to fit in, which they find exhausting.

Myth #4 – Introverts don’t like people. On the contrary, Introverts intensely value the few friends they have. They can count their close friends on one hand. If you are lucky enough for an introvert to consider you a friend, you probably have a loyal ally for life. Once you have earned their respect as being a person of substance, you’re in.

Myth #5 – Introverts don’t like to go out in public. Nonsense. Introverts just don’t like to go out in public FOR AS LONG. They also like to avoid the complications that are involved in public activities. They take in data and experiences very quickly, and as a result, don’t need to be there for long to “get it.” They’re ready to go home, recharge, and process it all. In fact, recharging is absolutely crucial for Introverts.

Myth #6 – Introverts always want to be alone. Introverts are perfectly comfortable with their own thoughts. They think a lot. They daydream. They like to have problems to work on, puzzles to solve. But they can also get incredibly lonely if they don’t have anyone to share their discoveries with. They crave an authentic and sincere connection with ONE PERSON at a time.

Myth #7 – Introverts are weird. Introverts are often individualists. They don’t follow the crowd. They’d prefer to be valued for their novel ways of living. They think for themselves and because of that, they often challenge the norm. They don’t make most decisions based on what is popular or trendy.

Myth #8 – Introverts are aloof nerds. Introverts are people who primarily look inward, paying close attention to their thoughts and emotions. It’s not that they are incapable of paying attention to what is going on around them, it’s just that their inner world is much more stimulating and rewarding to them.

Myth #9 – Introverts don’t know how to relax and have fun. Introverts typically relax at home or in nature, not in busy public places. Introverts are not thrill seekers and adrenaline junkies. If there is too much talking and noise going on, they shut down. Their brains are too sensitive to the neurotransmitter called Dopamine. Introverts and Extroverts have different dominant neuro-pathways. Just look it up.

Myth #10 – Introverts can fix themselves and become Extroverts. Introverts cannot “fix themselves” and deserve respect for their natural temperament and contributions to the human race. In fact, one study (Silverman, 1986) showed that the percentage of Introverts increases with IQ.

Finally someone that understands me! This is me to the last detail! I’m not weird. I can be defined. There’s hope yet.Seriously, this is so damn accurate. Can’t disagree with a single point. In the original article the first comment is by someone that suggests that this guy (original writer) may have aspergers or autism. All I can say is, ‘Crap!’. Being an introvert is a natural disposition of someone that has less time for pointless banter and is more interested in understanding why things are the way they are and why people do the things they do. Seeking social acceptance is not the objective of the life of an introvert. As it states above, they’re more about substance than they are about image.

You could double the number of synaptic connections in a very simple neurocircuit as a result of experience and learning. The reason for that was that long-term memory alters the expression of genes in nerve cells, which is the cause of the growth of new synaptic connections. When you see that at the cellular level, you realize that the brain can change because of experience. It gives you a different feeling about how nature and nurture interact. They are not separate processes.

Eric R. Kandel, Nobel Prize-winning neuroscientist.

A Quest to Understand How Memory Works.

(via storyseldomtold)

The fact that the brain changes because of experience, as I’ve mentioned in several of my previous posts on the subject, to me, confirms that our study of chemical imbalances to prove the prevalence of psychological disorders is focusing on the symptoms rather than the root cause. But it’s easier to be a victim to chemicals than a master of your thoughts. 

I am curious to know if you understand the importance of medicinal compliance with a mental disorder? I mean, your previous post would make sense if you were against pills and chemical changing drugs prescribed to those who have imbalances but otherwise, I find it's very insensitive.

I not only understand it, but I’ve lived it as well. I have been on anti-depressants before, I’ve flirted with suicide recklessly, and I’ve been exposed to the harsh realities of living with an extremely traumatised woman that was diagnosed with almost every mental disorder I’ve heard of. So this is not a subject I take lightly or treat flippantly.

But I disagree that medication should be used as anything more than an intervention strategy, and I fully believe that understanding the life experiences that gave rise to the anxiety or traumatised state must be unraveled in order to reverse the psychological damage that was caused by it. If left unresolved, these same experiences will continue to spiral out of control with the focus always being on the symptoms due to being distracted from the root cause. 

This may seem like an over simplification of this serious and sensitive issue, but it’s not intended that way at all. I’ve had significant life experiences, and witnessed many others, that support my views about the chemical imbalances being a symptom of the emotional state, and not the emotional state being a symptom of the chemical imbalances. 

Smiling is a simple act that is proven to release hormones that make us happy. If the current mainstream approach to mental health is to be believed, then it would imply that (for example) someone who does not have any level of those happy hormones in their body would be physically unable to smile. This is absurd.

I have personally experienced, and observed in others, that such troubled mental states are always present in individuals that have a history of either being betrayed, ill treated, bullied, molested, abused, or subjected to other unspeakable traumas earlier in life. In some cases, it’s a matter of someone growing up in a sheltered environment and are therefore unable to cope with the harsh realities of life and failure when faced with these in the absence of the support structures and comfort zones that they’ve grown accustomed to.

The mainstream approach to dealing with the emotional turmoil that results from these when they manifest themselves in our teenage or adult phases of our lives is to teach the patient (i.e. victim) coping mechanisms to deal with the current state, assisted with medication, thereby negating any need for the individual to understand, unravel and resolve the underlying life experience/s that gave rise to the demons in the first place. 

To answer your question more directly, having been on anti-depressants, I can assure you that I do not condone the reckless use/abuse of such medication, and that the compliance regimen must be maintained fully without ever attempting to suddenly disrupt the intake of such medication because of the disastrous effects that that has, which is why weaning oneself off the medication when needed is of critical importance. 

But this also means that those that knowingly take drugs and alcohol and other intoxicants to be blatantly but consciously reckless are simply seeking attention because it wins them the sympathy and affection they crave because the reality of dealing with the thoughts that they actively suppress is far too daunting. In choosing to deal with our demons, we sometimes consciously, and other times sub-consciously know that it implies that we are opening ourselves up for the potential of being exposed to such betrayal or hurt again. This, I believe, is the biggest driver behind people ‘needing’ the medication to justify their mental state, rather than facing their fears and dealing with the heartlessness of others.